Top Ten Memorable Tourism Campaigns (2018 edition)

It’s that time of year again! My Royal Roads University MA in Tourism Management students are sharing their most memorable tourism campaigns.

Here’s what’s top of mind for 2018:

  1. Imagine Your Korea. The MA student who shared this campaign had a personal connection to the destination, but said this captures the fun and vibrancy of the destination. Check out their YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/ibuzzkorea
  1. WestJet’s Christmas Miracle campaigns, which combine corporate giving with strong public and media relations. Too numerous to mention them all, a recent WestJet effort in the Dominican Republic offers a good example. Click here to watch it.
  1. “Red Sucks”, the video from a small mountain in the Kootenays. This campaign was a tongue-in-cheek look at 24-hours in a guest’s life at the local resort. Watch the video here.
RedSucks
The landing page for Red Sucks. It’s cheeky!
  1. The transcendent nature of the “Super, Natural British Columbia” brand that has persisted through several organizational structures to touch the hearts and minds of hundreds of visitors. Students this year referenced the Wild Within video (here) as being particularly memorable.
  1. Tourism Calgary, the Calgary Stampede and other stakeholders’ “Come Hell or High Water” statements, and “Calgary, We’re Open” a 2013 collective effort to invite visitors to the destination despite excessive flooding. See the official tourism video here.

5. UNILAD Adventures’ look at Zimbabwe, as posted on Facebook.

  1. “Pure Michigan” radio campaign, particularly in the Windsor-Quebec corridor. Apparently to those who live there, these spots are a near-constant presence.
AustraliaCampaign
This campaign has staying power.
  1. Tourism Australia’s “Best Job in the World” campaigns. Starting with a 2009 contest for the NSW region, this grew into a national youth-focused initiative drawing global attention.
  1. Canada shared by Canadians – Keep Exploring. This sweet video combines thousands of hours of submissions from across the country along with a chouette chanson in English et en francais. You can watch the video here.
1. And the “winner” is? Incredible India. I promoted this to the top spot because my BCIT undergrad students also voted this the top brand in our destination development course. Click here for a 2013 commercial from the campaign.
To view the list we created in 2017, click here. And let me know what campaign springs to your mind (from any era) in the comments below!

“How do I become a travel writer?”

One of the questions I get regularly is “how do I get paid to be a travel writer?”

This comes up frequently during informational interviews and at networking events. I’m by no means a prolific writer but I have had some success with it, and I sure do enjoy it. You can check out some of my recent work here .

Here’s what I share with prospective writers about my journey and what travel writing looks like to me.

Understand that for most, it’s a side job

I have never made a full living from travel writing, so as with many tourism professions, it helps to have a ‘day job’. If you’re starting out (e.g. early in your career) I recommend getting a steady job in accommodations, and then branching out in to writing from there. (Find out why I recommend starting in accommodations here.)

Know what perspective you have to offer, and provide samples

My daughter and I are planning a trip to Viet Nam so I’m pitching some ideas based on our itinerary, my perspective as a mom, and the “family travel” angle. I always provide a link to recent work published on another platform. I also try to pitch a specific concept to “e.g. Top 5” or “How to” and give the editors something to visualize. Note that in my experience, most of the time you’re going to want to plan the trip and then pitch the writing gig to the relevant publisher. I have been paid to take a trip and write, and it is awesome, but that came after I proved myself to that publisher.

Be a nice person (and as “real” as you can be)

This may sound trite, but it’s my philosophy for all things career (and life). Be kind to other people, and be yourself. I’m not the world’s most polished ‘professional’, and that’s ok. I’ve got a down-to-earth personality, I’m a ‘hugger’, and I’ve got a dirty mouth. I will rein all that in as needs be, but for the most part, what you see is what you get. I tend to end up working with people whose personality jives with all of that, and so far it’s working out.

Make lots of contacts at industry conferences, work, and school

Most of my writing gigs have come to me by way of industry events or via friends I’ve made in school (especially graduate school). If you follow my advice in terms of being a good person, and determining a point-of-view, you’ll start to attract gigs along the way.

Social plays a greater role than before

All that said, I started my writing career at a time before Facebook or Instagram even existed! People were using Ask Jeeves* for their travel plans. So my writing has had to evolve. The good news is, if you’re younger, the connection to social is automatic and instinctual. You know about keywords and being an ‘influencer’ and the importance of video. Harness that and share it with platforms that are crying out for better content!

Stick with it

Last bit of advice here, and that’s to stick with it. If you have a day job, set reminders in your calendar to reach out to new platforms and make connections at blogs and magazines. This is the hardest advice to follow myself – but if you make time for your craft on a regular basis, and dedicate time to developing relationships with publishers, you’ll get there faster.

*ironically, if you don’t know what this is, I suggest you Google it

 

The Early Nerd Catches the Soundbite

cbcoldschoolsmall
Old School CBC

This morning I had the honour of Skytraining down to the CBC offices prior to the crack of dawn to chat with Stephen Quinn about the dramatic (and awesome) uptick in visitation numbers to Vancouver.

Let’s face it, tourism is crushing it lately and you can read about it here, and here, and here, and here, and most recently with headlines celebrating the record-setting year for Tourism in Vancouver at over 10 million visits.

Our illustrious tourism marketing management department head had another engagement, so he passed the torch to me. I’m not a morning person but I hope I did the sector proud on air – despite the challenge of distilling a very complex “overnight success story” into a couple of minutes.

I’ll admit I was geeking out at the chance to sit across from Stephen and speak on a show we listen to every morning at home. I mentioned I was excited.  He cautioned me not to be “too excited”. How did I do? Was I, in Stephen’s words, the “right level of excited”?

Judge for yourself! Visit the Early Edition webpage here:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/programs/theearlyedition